Verizon tested super fast 10GBps internet Technology

By | August 12, 2015


verizon



Verizon has announced that it has successfully tested ultra fast fiber optics broadband, which can reach speed up to 10 GB per second. The aim of this ultra fast internet services is that one can stream even ultra HD 4K video in the future.



This super fast internet tech is called next-generation passive optical network or NG-PON2 and this is very fast network if we compared to others. It is ten time faster than Google Fiber, which means it is 1,000 time faster than the current normal broadband network, as Google Fiber is itself 100 times faster than the normal broadband speed.
According to Verizon, the NG-PON2 internet tech can give users speed between 10 GBps and 80 GBps in near future. This new system uses an optical line terminal (OLT), which has capacity to generate four wavelengths of light, where each wavelength can support speed up to 10 GBps down and 2.5 GBps up.



The most interesting thing about this network is that, it can transmit both signal Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Network (GPON) and the next-generation passive optical network (NG-PON2) simultaneously. If any one of the wavelength fails due to any reason, the network will switch over to one of any other three wavelength and will restore the 10 GBps connection pretty quickly.

Lee Hicks, the VP of network technology at Verizon said, “Deploying this exciting new technology sets a new standard for the broadband industry and further validates our strategic choice of fiber-to-the-premises.”
The company has to upgrade its hardware and software for this network, so Verizon will issue “requests for proposals” for the required hardware and software later this year. With this new internet tech company is planning to offer 4K video streaming in near future.

There is still no word on when exactly the internet service will be available online, but it surely looks that this will be available for business purpose firstly. The price and the release date of this NG-PON2 is still unclear.